The Augusta Cemetery Family Trees

Thomas KinseyAge: 74 years18061880

Name
Thomas Kinsey
Given names
Thomas
Surname
Kinsey
Note: Visit Thomas' page on the Augusta Cemetery website: http://www.augustacemetery-ohio.com/Residents/K/Kinsey-Thomas/Kinsey-Thomas.htm
Birth July 21, 1806
Citation details: Book 1 Page 90
Text:
Birth date calculated from date of death, 28 Dec 1880, and age at death, 74y 5m 7d.
Civil marriageJane RowleyView this family
January 5, 1835 (Age 28 years)
Citation details: Ret. 184
Text:
Thomas Kinsey Jane Johnston 5 Jan 1835 Off. #10 (Charles H. Hays JP, Augusta Tp) Page 36
Census September 15, 1850 (Age 44 years)
Citation details: Dist. No. 16
Text:
THOMAS KINSEY 47 M Inkeeper Real 2500 born England, married; JANE KINSEY 65 F Born England, married; MARY J. MANFULL 21 F Born England; ANN DUNBLETON 15 F Born England, Attends School; WILLIAM SHOEMAKER 30 M Physician, Born VA.
Census July 2, 1860 (Age 53 years)
Citation details: Page 64
Text:
THOMAS KINSEY 54 M W Hotel Keeper, Real 3000 Personal 800, born England; JANE KINSEY 75 F W born England; HARIET A. JACKSON 21 F W born OH.
Death of a wifeJane Rowley
March 20, 1864 (Age 57 years)

Census June 25, 1870 (Age 63 years)
Citation details: Page 1
Text:
JONT MILBOURN 50 M W Carpenter Real 1200, Personal 3000, born OH, Male Citizen of US 21 yrs & up; REBECCA MILBOURN 37 F W Keeps House, born OH; MANFULL MILBOURN 18 M W Clerk Store, born OH; MARY J. MILBOURN 17 F W At home, born OH; THOMAS MILBOURN 2 M W At home, born OH KINSEY, THOMAS 64 M W Innkeeper Real 4950, Personal 3000, born England, parents of foreign birth, Male Citized of US over 21 yrs & up.
MarriageChristina CampbellView this family
June 15, 1871 (Age 64 years)
Birth of a daughter
#1
Isabella Campbell Kinsey
about March 29, 1872 (Age 65 years)

Citation details: Book 1 Page 47
Note: Birth date calculated from Carroll County Death Record.
Death of a daughterIsabella Campbell Kinsey
May 7, 1873 (Age 66 years)
Cause: Consumption
Citation details: Book 1 Page 47
Text:
KINSEY, J. B. McD.C. - d. 1873 May 7 of consumption in Augusta, 1y 1m 8d, female.
Burial of a daughterIsabella Campbell Kinsey
after May 7, 1873 (Age 66 years)
Cemetery: Augusta Cemetery, Sec A, Row 14
Publication: Carroll County Genealogical Society, Carrollton, Ohio 44615
Citation details: Page 14
Text:
CHAMPER, Isabella d/o Thomas Champer (badly weather) (broken)
Note: The stone clearly gives the first name of the child buried there and she is buried next to her father, Thomas KINSEY.
Birth of a daughter
#2
Mary Jane Campbell Kinsey
August 5, 1873 (Age 67 years)
Birth of a son
#3
John Campbell Kinsey
February 8, 1875 (Age 68 years)
Birth of a daughter
#4
Gertrude B. Campbell Kinsey
January 28, 1877 (Age 70 years)
Birth of a son
#5
Thomas James Campbell “T. J.” Kinsey
August 11, 1878 (Age 72 years)
Citation details: Page 261
Text:
KINSEY: Thomas and Christena CAMPBELL of Augusta Tp 1873 Aug 5 Mary Jane C. bk.1 p.81 #92.12 1875 Feb 8 John Campbell bk.1 p.95 #160.6 1877 Jan 28 Gertrude B. bk.1 p.123 #284.17 1878 Aug 11 Thomas J. bk.2 p.15 #161.15
Census June 12, 1880 (Age 73 years)
Citation details: Page 14 ED 30
Text:
THOMAS KINSEY W M 73 Married Farmer Thomas & parents born England; CHRISTENA KINSEY W F 30 Wife Married Keeping House Christena & parents born Scotland; MARY J. C. KINSEY W F 6 Daughter Single At Home Attends school Born OH Father born England Mother born Scotland; JOHN C. KINSEY W M 5 Son Single born Ohio Father born England Mother born Scotland; GERTRUDE B. C. KINSEY W F 3 Daughter Single born Ohio Father born England Mother born Scotland; THOMAS J. C. KINSEY W M 1 Son Single born Ohio Father born England Mother born Scotland.
Death December 28, 1880 (Age 74 years)
Cause of death: Paralysis
Citation details: Bk 1 Page 90
Text:
KINSEY, Thomas - d. 1880 Dec 28 of paralysis in Augusta, b. Chester Co, PA, 74y 5m 7d, married, farmer.
Note:
All census records indicate that Thomas Kinsey was born in England. It is a possibility that the place of birth may be Chester, England. The memorial address included herein also lists the place of birth as England.
Burial December 30, 1880 (2 days after death)
Cemetery: Augusta Cemetery, Sec A, Row 14
Publication: Carroll County Genealogical Society, Carrollton, Ohio 44615
Citation details: Page 14
Text:
KINSEY, Thomas; d Dec. 28. 1880; ae 74y 6m 7d. Section A Row 14
Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
himself
Family with Jane Rowley - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: January 5, 1835Carroll County, Ohio
Family with Christina Campbell - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: June 15, 1871Inverness, Scotland
9 months
daughter
16 months
daughter
18 months
son
John Campbell Kinsey
Birth: February 8, 1875 68 35Augusta, Carroll County, Ohio
Death: June 20, 1895Augusta, Carroll County, Ohio
2 years
daughter
18 months
son
Christopher Johnston + Jane Rowley - View this family
wife’s husband
wife
Marriage: November 21, 1818Washington, D.C.
Abraham Haines + Christina Campbell - View this family
wife’s husband
wife
Marriage: after 1902

BirthCarroll County, Ohio Death Records
Citation details: Book 1 Page 90
Text:
Birth date calculated from date of death, 28 Dec 1880, and age at death, 74y 5m 7d.
MarriageCarroll County Ohio Early Marriages 1833-1849, Vol I
Citation details: Ret. 184
Text:
Thomas Kinsey Jane Johnston 5 Jan 1835 Off. #10 (Charles H. Hays JP, Augusta Tp) Page 36
CensusCensus, Federal, 1850
Citation details: Dist. No. 16
Text:
THOMAS KINSEY 47 M Inkeeper Real 2500 born England, married; JANE KINSEY 65 F Born England, married; MARY J. MANFULL 21 F Born England; ANN DUNBLETON 15 F Born England, Attends School; WILLIAM SHOEMAKER 30 M Physician, Born VA.
CensusCensus, Federal, 1860
Citation details: Page 64
Text:
THOMAS KINSEY 54 M W Hotel Keeper, Real 3000 Personal 800, born England; JANE KINSEY 75 F W born England; HARIET A. JACKSON 21 F W born OH.
CensusCensus, Federal, 1870
Citation details: Page 1
Text:
JONT MILBOURN 50 M W Carpenter Real 1200, Personal 3000, born OH, Male Citizen of US 21 yrs & up; REBECCA MILBOURN 37 F W Keeps House, born OH; MANFULL MILBOURN 18 M W Clerk Store, born OH; MARY J. MILBOURN 17 F W At home, born OH; THOMAS MILBOURN 2 M W At home, born OH KINSEY, THOMAS 64 M W Innkeeper Real 4950, Personal 3000, born England, parents of foreign birth, Male Citized of US over 21 yrs & up.
CensusCensus, Federal, 1880
Citation details: Page 14 ED 30
Text:
THOMAS KINSEY W M 73 Married Farmer Thomas & parents born England; CHRISTENA KINSEY W F 30 Wife Married Keeping House Christena & parents born Scotland; MARY J. C. KINSEY W F 6 Daughter Single At Home Attends school Born OH Father born England Mother born Scotland; JOHN C. KINSEY W M 5 Son Single born Ohio Father born England Mother born Scotland; GERTRUDE B. C. KINSEY W F 3 Daughter Single born Ohio Father born England Mother born Scotland; THOMAS J. C. KINSEY W M 1 Son Single born Ohio Father born England Mother born Scotland.
DeathCarroll County, Ohio Death Records
Citation details: Bk 1 Page 90
Text:
KINSEY, Thomas - d. 1880 Dec 28 of paralysis in Augusta, b. Chester Co, PA, 74y 5m 7d, married, farmer.
BurialCarroll County Ohio Cemeteries, Carroll County 1802-1990, Vol. I
Publication: Carroll County Genealogical Society, Carrollton, Ohio 44615
Citation details: Page 14
Text:
KINSEY, Thomas; d Dec. 28. 1880; ae 74y 6m 7d. Section A Row 14
NoteObituary
Citation details: Ohio Repository, December 29, 1880
SourceCanton Repository
Publication: Canton, Oh
Citation details: Dec. 29, 1880
Text:
Sudden Death - Tom Kinsey, a resident of Augusta, O., aged about 76 and an Englishman by birth, was found dead in his hay mow around 12 o'clock yesterday, having died of heart disease while in the act of throwing down hay for his sheep. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity, and that order will have charge of funeral services, which will take place tomorrow at 11 o'clock. The deceased was also a member of the Odd Fellows.
Name
Death
All census records indicate that Thomas Kinsey was born in England. It is a possibility that the place of birth may be Chester, England. The memorial address included herein also lists the place of birth as England.
Note
Published in the Ohio Repository, Thu 29 Dec 1880, pg 4, col 2 SUDDEN DEATH----Thomas Kinsey, a resident of Augusta, O, aged about 70, and an Englishman by birth, was found dead in his hay mow about 12 o'clock yesterday, having died of heart disease while in the act of throwing down hay to his sheep. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity, and that order will have charge of the funeral services, which will be held tomorrow at 11 o'clock. The deceased was also a member of the Odd Fellows.
Note
Published in CARROLL COUNTY CHRONICLE, Friday, Jan 7, 1881 THOMAS KINSEY MEMORIAL ADDRESS DELIVERED BEFORE AUGUSTA LODGE, NO. 499 I.O.O.F. AT ITS REGULAR MEETING, JANUARY 1ST, 1881, BY WM. M. ROACH, P.G. PUBLISHED AT REQUEST OF THE LODGE. The special hour for memorial addresses having arrived, Brother Roach arose in his place and addressed the Lodge as follows: Noble Grand and Brethren: I beg that you will bear with me but for a few moments. I am sure that it is not that I would wantonly waste the time of this lodge that I crave permission to lay upon an honored bier a wreath of “Cypress and bay,” and also to bring my personal tribute to the memory of an old friend. ‘Tis meet that we should pause for a moment in our deliberations, and sit in silence and uncovered heads beneath the passing cloud of sorrow. We are constantly reminded, as from time to time, we are summoned to attend at the bed-side of the sick, or as day after day we are called upon to follow our fellow creatures “to that bourne whence no traveler returns” of that sovereign decree, “it is appointed unto man once to die.” The fiat of nature is inexorable. There is no appeal for relief from the great law which dooms us o dust. We flourish and fade as the leaves of the forest; and the flowers that bloom and wither in a day have no frailer hold upon life than the mightiest monarch that ever shook the earth with his footsteps. “In the midst of life we are in death.” For the third time within the history of this body has the great gavel fallen in the Celestial Lodge, and the places that once knew our Venerable Kinsey “shall know him no more forever.” Brother Thomas Kinsey is dead. “Leaves have their time to fall, And flowers to wither at the North-wind’s breath, And stars to set—but all, Thou hast all seasons for thine own, O Death!” As the mid-day sun was nearing its zenith on the 28th day of December 1880, the deceased was suddenly and perhaps without warning stricken down by the hand of death, and his spirit, tired of earth and its toils, took its flight to that land where sorrow and tears, sickness and death are never known. The summons was as unexpected to us, his brethren, as to him and we were for an instant paralyzed by the sudden blow. Alone and away from family and home, with no kind hand to raise the head or soothe the aching brow; with no one near to catch his dying words, our brother laid down by the wayside to rest—sweet rest. How many of us will ever forget the sadness and melancholy feeling that settled over us as we realized for the first time, that our little circle, growing smaller, from day to day, was again broken—that our brother whom we all honored and loved was gone from us no more to return. But his voice is hushed. His chair is vacant. No more shall our hearts be gladdened as we see him enter this room and take his place around our altar; no more shall we listen to his kind greetings and words of cheer. I remember the last time our brother met with us. It was a sacred hour. Would that I had known it was to be the last. We were not expecting or looking for him. Lodge had not opened—he always came early. There were some six or seven of us seated together. We heard him enter the ante room; he waited there but a moment, the inner door opened and our aged brother entered. Oh! What joy filled our hearts as we looked up and beheld that aged head covered with the snow of many winters. Instantly all were on their feet. Bros. Turnipseed, Trogler, Cunnigham, and others whom I do not now recall—each striving to reach him first—each anxious to out do the other in their words of welcome. I shall never forget that night. We all gathered around the noble form of that old Patriarch. For nearly half a century had he been laboring in the cause of suffering humanity under the banner we love so well, and although he had during that time formed other associations, he failed not to remember his first love—our order. For this he had our respect—nay our love. Brother Kinsey was born in Chischestershire, England, July 21, 1806, and was at the time of his death in his 75th year. Leaving his birthplace, the home of his boyhood with all its associations, he emigrated to the United States, landing in New York, November 2nd, 1830. In a short time after, we find him in Pittsburgh, where he remained for some two or three years. It was while in Pittsburgh he first visited this place. He came then as the bearer of a message, coming through on foot, as there was no communication between any point near here and Pittsburgh at that time. He only remained here a few days when he returned. From Pittsburgh he next finds his way to Cincinnati. How long he remained we are unable to ascertain. We next hear of him in Covington, KY, where he remained until some time in 1835, when he again found his way back to Augusta and from which year his residence here dates. It was during that year that he married a Mrs. Jane Johnson, whose husband had died some time previous and who was at that time keeping what was known by the name of the “Western hotel.” After his marriage with Mrs. Johnson, the deceased assumed the role of landlord. The name of “Kinsey” and the “Western Hotel” became known by all the traveling community for miles around, and many of them have traveled miles out of their road to get to pass a night or eat a meal at his house. Shortly after the death of his wife which occurred in March, 1863,the deceased having gathered together enough of this world’s means to provide comfort for the future, gave up his old tavern stand and devoted his time to looking after his farm and to travel. In 1870 he concluded to visit his native land. His travels there extended over the greater part of England and Scotland, and it was while on one of these visits at Inverness, Scotland, in 1871 that he married Miss Christina Campbell, who with four small children survive him. In June 1871, Brother Kinsey and wife, returned to our midst. Having previously sold the old tavern stand he repurchased it, and has since used it as his private dwelling. The history of our departed brother as an Odd Fellow may be briefly told. He was initiated into the Mechanics Lodge, No. 3, Pittsburgh, Pa., during the year 1831 or 1832—48 years ago. From this Lodge he asked for and obtained a withdrawal or a clearance card. On his arrival in Cincinnati his card was deposited for a short time in one of the three lodges there. Removing to Covington, Ky., and knowing the benefits of the order, he again obtained his card and deposited it in Covington Lodge of that city. With this Lodge he held membership until the year 1870, at which time he asked for and obtained his card in order that he might unite with Minerva Lodge 222. In 1871 Augusta Lodge was instituted and in December of that year he moved his membership from 222 to this, since which time his home has been with us until the day of his death, when at his own and wife’s request we were called upon to perform the last sad rites which the living owe the dead. As a citizen he was upright, conscientious, and exact in all his dealings. As a man in all his relations of society, whether in his domestic or more enlarged circles, no cloud dims a page of his history. Of his religion—what shall I say? Since his death, near where he was wont to, set while doing his morning and evening milking, there was found, under a board on a shelf and within easy reach, a leaf from an old time-worn Hymn book. Did this contain his belief and rule of action? Was this his creed? I quote from that leaf—listen: Be our strength for we are weakness, Be our wisdom and our guide; May we walk in Love and Meekness, Near to our Saviour’ side, Naught can harm us While we thus in thee abide. Thus when evening shades shall gather, We may turn our tearless eye; To the dwellings of our Father, To our home beyond the sky, Gently passing to the happier land on high. Blest beyond all earthly blessing, Is the child whose tender youth, In the Lord a guide possessing Walks in ways of light and truth. He will govern those who love him, Those who walk in faith and fear; In all danger still shall prove him Gracious, kind and ever near. Heavenly Father let us prove thee, An all wise protecting friend; Make us fear thee, make us love thee Constant to our latest end. How often has our dead brother read and repeated these sacred truths and supplications? How often has his hoary head, silently and unseen, save by the Great Father—been bowed in fervent prayer to the Great Giver of all? How often has his mighty chest heaved from inward emotions, as on bended knee, and with outstretched arm he has asked that “Thy Kingdom come, thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven?” Like all humanity he had his frailties, but the tomb enfolds them with the body. We cherish only the memories of his virtues. Our brother’s time had fully come. The three score years and ten, marking the ordinary period of human life, had been passed, when full of honor, he passed away worthy of the honor, let his name be added to the roll of our illustrious dead, where it will be still preserved when the marble above him shall have mouldered away. My brothers we have lost an able, an honest and a true man. I knew him intimately. Sadly I offer this humble tribute to his virtues and memories, and admonish you “be ye also ready.” To the widow and orphans bereft in the death of our brother we tender our deepest sympathy, and pray that God in his great mercy may take them under His kind and protecting care.