The Augusta Cemetery Family Trees

John de MarkhamAge: 41 years13681409

Name
John de Markham
Given names
John
Surname
de Markham
Birth 1368
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Text:
Following in the steps of his father and grandfather, Sir John Markham applied himself to the study of the law, in which he was eminently successful. In Richard II's time he had become serjeant-at-law, and was entrusted to draw up the instrument for deposing that monarch; moreover he was appointed one of the commission to receive the crown which the unfortunate Richard resigned in favour of his rival Henry of Bolingbroke. In process of time, Sir John Markham became Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas; according to Lord Campbell, he filled that office from the year 1396 to 1406, but it is elsewhere stated that he did not resign till 1408, the year before his death. (Per page 9 of "A History of the Markham Family" published by David Frederick Markham in 1854.) In the fifteenth year of Richard II (1382), the whole of East Markham became the property of Sir John Markham, and it was handed down entire to his descendants. Sir John Markham was married twice (per page 13 of (Per page 9 of "A History of the Markham Family" published by David Frederick Markham in 1854.): his first wife was Elizabeth, daughter and coheir of Henri de Cressi, in the time of Henry II. Sir John married for his second wife Milicent, daughter and heir of Sir Thomas de Bekeryng, and widow of Sir Nicholas Bourdon, by whom he had two children: Sir John, afterwards Lord Chief Justice of England, "the great ornament", says Camden, "of this family, who tempered his judgments with so much equity that his name will endure as long as time itself;" and Margaret, who married Sir Walter Pitwardyn. Milicent died in 1419. Upon a fair marble tomb in the church of East Markham was this inception: His jacet Domina Milicensia que obiit 27 September 1419. Upon it are impaled the arms of her different husbands on several coats. Sir John Markham died in the tenth year of Henry IV (reign 1399-1413) as may be seen by his monument still existing in East Markham church on the north side of the chancel. It bears the following description: Orate pro anima Johannis Markham Justiciarii, qui obiit in festo S Silvestri, anno Dom. 1409 By his first wife, Elizabeth de Cressi, Sir John had two sons and one daughter, Adela, the wife of Sir Robert Stanhope, who had a monument erected to their memory in York Minister now destroyed; Henry was the second son, who appears never to have been married, and the eldest son, Sir Robert, succeeded his father. Source: Reverend David Frederick Markham (1854) A History of the Markham Family, London: John Bowyer Nichols and Sons, pp. 7-14. ************************ If the tradition of lawyers be true, that an intrepid judge in the reign of Henry IV (reign 1399-1413), committed the Prince of Wales to prison for contempt of court, Sir John was probably the judge in question...In Henry IV time, he was Judge of ye Common Pleas. When a servant of ye Prince of Wales was to be judged before him, ye Prince sending to have him released, ye Judge refused, ye Prince with an unruly route came and required it, ye Judge refused, ye Prince stroke ye Judge on ye face, ye committed ye Prince to ye Fleet. (from "Nottingham History" by A. P. Nicholson, printed 2007, revised 2020.)
MarriageElizabeth de CressiView this family
1385 (Age 17 years)
Publication: Family Search. A service provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
Birth of a son
#1
Sir Robert Markham I
August 1406 (Age 38 years)
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Text:
SIR LORD ROBERT MARKHAM was born about 1406 of Sedgebrook, Lincolnshire, England, to John Markham (1368-1409) and Elizabeth Creessy (1478-1408.) He married Elizabeth Bourdon about 1425 of Sedgebrook, Lincolnshire, England. Robert Markham died 12 October 1446, age 40. Buried at St. John the Baptist Church, East Markham, Bassetlaw, Nottinghamshire, England: LADY ELIZABETH BOURDON (BURDON), BARONESS OF MARKHAM, was born about 1408 of Sedgebrook, Lincolnshire, England, to Sir Nicholas Bourdon (1380-1472) and Lady Millicent De Beckering (1387-1475.) She married Robert Markham about 1425 of Sedgebrook, Lincolnshire, England. Elizabeth Bourdon passed away about 1460 of Sedgebrook, Lincolnshire, England, age 52. Sedgebrook Manor 1905 , Sedgebrook, Lincolnshire Douglas Elliottadded this on 3 May 2010 Category Type: Site / Building / Place Lincolnshire, England Wikitree: Elizabeth Burdon,[1][2] is the only child of: • Nicholas Burdon of Maplebeck, co. Notts. (d. 21 Jul 1403 Battle of Shrewsbury);[1] • and Millicent, dau. of John Burdon.[1] Her mother remarried to Sir John Markham of East Markham (d. 1409); and eventually took a third husband, Sir William Meryng, the same year her second husband died.[1] Marriage Elizabeth married Sir Robert Markham of East Markham, co. Notts., who was also the son of her mother's second husband.[ ************************ Sir Robert Markham married Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Sir John Burdon and Elizabeth de Bekeryng his wife; by which marriage the manors of Maplebec and Boughton were settled upon him. By this lady, Sir Robert had four children: Elizabeth, married to Sir Thomas Molineux of Hawton, created Knight Bannert by Richard III at Berwick; Margaret, the wife of Sir Henry Willoughby, also a Knight Bannert; and Katherine, the wife of Sir Henry Bozome of Severton. The fourth child was his son Robert, who succeded him. The exact time of his death is uncertain; it was probably in the early part of the reign of Henry IV. Both Sir Robert and his lady were buried at Sedgbrook, the seat of his brother the chief justice, and in the "quayer of the church, in a window on the syde of the Ladyes chapel," are three pictures with inscriptions as follows-- 1st. A man in coat armour, whereon the Markham coat; under it "Sir Robert Markham." 2nd. A woman, and under her "Dame Elizabeth Markham." 3rd. A man as before, and underneath "Sir Robert, Knight, son of Sir Robert." A pious act is recorded of this worthy couple, of having founded, July the fifteenth, 1434, an oratory in the chuch of Southwell; and the arms of Markham of Cotham are stated to have been standing in one of the windows of the great hall of the palace of Southwell, probably those of his son and heir. ************************ Per "Nottingham History" by A. P. Nicholson, printed 2007, revised 2020, it states Robert Markham ... married Elizabeth Burdon, his stepmother's daughter. ( ************************ By Elizabeth Bourdon, Sir Robert had four children: Elizabeth, married to Sir Thomas Molineaux of Hawton; Margaret married to Sir Henry Willoughby; Katherine married to Sir Henry Bozome of Severton; and Robert who succeeded him.
Death of a wifeElizabeth de Cressi
September 27, 1408 (Age 40 years)
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Death November 30, 1409 (Age 41 years)
Publication: Family Search. A service provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
Family with Elizabeth de Cressi - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: 1385Cotham, Nottinghamshire, England
22 years
son

BirthFamily Search Family Tree
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Text:
Following in the steps of his father and grandfather, Sir John Markham applied himself to the study of the law, in which he was eminently successful. In Richard II's time he had become serjeant-at-law, and was entrusted to draw up the instrument for deposing that monarch; moreover he was appointed one of the commission to receive the crown which the unfortunate Richard resigned in favour of his rival Henry of Bolingbroke. In process of time, Sir John Markham became Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas; according to Lord Campbell, he filled that office from the year 1396 to 1406, but it is elsewhere stated that he did not resign till 1408, the year before his death. (Per page 9 of "A History of the Markham Family" published by David Frederick Markham in 1854.) In the fifteenth year of Richard II (1382), the whole of East Markham became the property of Sir John Markham, and it was handed down entire to his descendants. Sir John Markham was married twice (per page 13 of (Per page 9 of "A History of the Markham Family" published by David Frederick Markham in 1854.): his first wife was Elizabeth, daughter and coheir of Henri de Cressi, in the time of Henry II. Sir John married for his second wife Milicent, daughter and heir of Sir Thomas de Bekeryng, and widow of Sir Nicholas Bourdon, by whom he had two children: Sir John, afterwards Lord Chief Justice of England, "the great ornament", says Camden, "of this family, who tempered his judgments with so much equity that his name will endure as long as time itself;" and Margaret, who married Sir Walter Pitwardyn. Milicent died in 1419. Upon a fair marble tomb in the church of East Markham was this inception: His jacet Domina Milicensia que obiit 27 September 1419. Upon it are impaled the arms of her different husbands on several coats. Sir John Markham died in the tenth year of Henry IV (reign 1399-1413) as may be seen by his monument still existing in East Markham church on the north side of the chancel. It bears the following description: Orate pro anima Johannis Markham Justiciarii, qui obiit in festo S Silvestri, anno Dom. 1409 By his first wife, Elizabeth de Cressi, Sir John had two sons and one daughter, Adela, the wife of Sir Robert Stanhope, who had a monument erected to their memory in York Minister now destroyed; Henry was the second son, who appears never to have been married, and the eldest son, Sir Robert, succeeded his father. Source: Reverend David Frederick Markham (1854) A History of the Markham Family, London: John Bowyer Nichols and Sons, pp. 7-14. ************************ If the tradition of lawyers be true, that an intrepid judge in the reign of Henry IV (reign 1399-1413), committed the Prince of Wales to prison for contempt of court, Sir John was probably the judge in question...In Henry IV time, he was Judge of ye Common Pleas. When a servant of ye Prince of Wales was to be judged before him, ye Prince sending to have him released, ye Judge refused, ye Prince with an unruly route came and required it, ye Judge refused, ye Prince stroke ye Judge on ye face, ye committed ye Prince to ye Fleet. (from "Nottingham History" by A. P. Nicholson, printed 2007, revised 2020.)
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