The Augusta Cemetery Family Trees

James Maynard Roadside Marker

James MaynardAge: 102 years17501852

Name
James Maynard
Given names
James
Surname
Maynard
Birth about 1750 29 30
Death of a paternal grandfatherWilliam Henry Maynard
October 13, 1752 (Age 2 years)
Source: Geni
Military
American Revolutionary War
about 1776 (Age 26 years)
Citation details: Charleston Gazette-Mail News Article, March 3, 2016
Text:
According to a Revolutionary War veteran’s pension application Maynard filed for, at age 83, he enlisted as a private in a Wilkes County, North Carolina militia unit commanded by Col. Benjamin Cleveland. The colonel lived in Maynard’s hometown of Roaring River, North Carolina, at the time Maynard signed up. “The intention was for me to go down to the sea coast around Charleston, South Carolina, but something occurred which prevented the Wilkes troops from going to the south,” Maynard said during his pension application hearing. That “something” was an outbreak of hostilities by Tories -- citizens loyal to the crown -- in western North Carolina. “The Tories done considerable damage, by killing and murdering the inhabitants that were friendly to American liberty,” Maynard was quoted as saying on his pension application. His militia company, nicknamed “Cleveland’s Bulldogs,” became known as “Cleveland’s Devils” to the British sympathizers they encountered. While Maynard said he took part in no major battles, he was involved in numerous skirmishes with Tories, from the headwaters of the New River to the highlands of Grayson County, Virginia, during his 15 months of Revolutionary War service. One of the officers he served under, Capt. Jesse Franklin, served after the war as a congressman, a U.S. senator, and governor of North Carolina.
MarriageSarah JohnsonView this family
about 1789 (Age 39 years)
Birth of a son
#1
Jesse Maynard
about 1790 (Age 40 years)

Source: Find A Grave
Birth of a son
#2
Charles Maynard
about 1793 (Age 43 years)
Death of a wifeSarah Johnson
about 1799 (Age 49 years)

MarriageChaney SmithView this family
December 25, 1801 (Age 51 years)
Citation details: FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XFS7-54K : 4 November 2017)
Text:
Name: James Maynard Titles and Terms: Event Type: Marriage Event Date: 10 Mar 1808 Event Place: Wilkes, North Carolina, United States Event Place (Original): Gender: Male Age: Marital Status: Race: Birth Date: Birth Year (Estimated): Birthplace: Marriage License Date: Father's Name: Father's Titles and Terms: Mother's Name: Mother's Titles and Terms: Spouse's Name: Chaney Smith Spouse's Titles and Terms: Spouse's Gender: Female Spouse's Age: Spouse's Race: Spouse's Birth Date: Spouse's Birth Year (Estimated): Spouse's Birthplace: Spouse's Father's Name: Spouse's Father's Titles and Terms: Spouse's Mother's Name: Spouse's Mother's Titles and Terms: Reference ID: GS Film Number: 001730604 Digital Folder Number: 004364804 Image Number: 00191 Citing this Record: "North Carolina, County Marriages, 1762-1979 ," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XFS7-54K : 4 November 2017), James Maynard and Chaney Smith, 10 Mar 1808; citing Wilkes, North Carolina, United States, p. , Office of Archives and History, Division of Archives and Records. State Archive of North Carolina and various county Register of Deeds; FHL microfilm 1,730,604.
Birth of a son
#3
James Maynard
May 1807 (Age 57 years)
Source: Find A Grave
Death of a fatherWilliam Maynard
February 22, 1816 (Age 66 years)
Source: Find A Grave
Death of a motherAgatha Damron
November 1818 (Age 68 years)
Source: Find A Grave
Birth of a son
#4
Simeon Maynard
1819 (Age 69 years)
Source: Find A Grave
Marriage of a childCharles MaynardLucinda MaynardView this family
February 24, 1821 (Age 71 years)
Source: Find A Grave
Census August 14, 1850 (Age 100 years)
Citation details: FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M8DY-HGK : 12 April 2016)
Text:
Name: James Mainard Event Type: Census Event Year: 1850 Event Place: Wayne county, part of, Wayne, Virginia, United States Gender: Male Age: 107 Race: White Race (Original): Birth Year (Estimated): 1743 Birthplace: Virginia Household ID: 462 House Number: 439 Line Number: 27 Affiliate Name: The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) Affiliate Publication Number: M432 Affiliate Film Number: 980 GS Film Number: 444970 Digital Folder Number: 004206470 Image Number: 00501 Household Role Sex Age Birthplace James Mainard M 107 Virginia Chaine Mainard F 70 Virginia Citing this Record: "United States Census, 1850," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M8DY-HGK : 12 April 2016), James Mainard, Wayne county, part of, Wayne, Virginia, United States; citing family 462, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
Death October 13, 1852 (Age 102 years)
Event
James Maynard Obituary
after October 13, 1852

Source: Find A Grave
Burial after October 13, 1852
Source: Find A Grave

Event
Certificate of Pension issued
April 17, 1857 (4 years after death)

Source: Find A Grave
Event
Plaque Dedicated to Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried in Wayne County, West Virginia
April 1978 (125 years after death)

Source: Find A Grave
Event
Revolutionary War Soldier’s Grave Found
February 2016 (163 years after death)

Text:
Revolutionary War Soldier’s Grave Found Two weeks ago, after ten years of intense searching, and checking hundreds of Wayne County cemeteries, Robert (Bobby) Maynard and his father, Ronald (Ron) Maynard, members of The Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society, located the grave of James Maynard in the Queens Ridge Cemetery. Robert said that he actually laid down on the ground to make sure this was the grave of his Maynard ancestor. He then applied chalk to bring out the hidden images on the field stone. He discovered the initials J. M. first. Then he could identify the numbers 175__. It was then that he realized that the zero was the missing number. Genealogical records indicate that James Maynard was born around 1750. From the location on the crown of the hill, and the closeness of his son, Jesse Maynard, with whom James was staying in the 1850 census of Wayne County, VA/WV, another clue was found. This cemetery has had excellent care over the years, and it contains many field stones. Several of these field stones still have readable images after so many years. There are hundreds, possibly thousands, of descendants of James Maynard still living. The Queens Ridge Cemetery is located on property which is nearly surrounded by the property of Penn Coal Corporation, and it can be reached by following the Coal Haul Road from the Cabwaylingo Park Road near Missouri Branch, Wayne County, WV. James Maynard, the Revolutionary War Soldier, was born in Virginia in 1750, moved to Wilkes County, N. C., served in the Revolutionary War there, and moved to Kentucky around 1816. He was listed as a member in the "Roaring River Baptist Church," in the late 1780’s and 1790’s prior to moving to Floyd County, Ky. James Maynard , a resident of Wilkes Co. N.C. enlisted for six months as a private under Captain Jesse Franklin and Colonel Benjamin Cleveland. He moved from Wilkes Co. N.C. to Floyd County, KY, and from there to Pike County, KY. He was granted a pension on Sept 1, 1832, as a citizen of Pike Co. KY. In 1841 he was living in Cabell Co. VA (that part of Cabell which became Wayne Co. in 1842). He died Oct 13, 1852, in Wayne County, VA/WV, and the location of his grave became unknown until discovered by Robert and Ronnie Maynard. The widow of James Maynard, Chaney Smith, whom he married Dec. 25, 1801 in Wilkes County, NC, was allowed a pension in her application on February 28, 1857, at which time she was seventy seven years of age and living in Wayne County, VA/WV. Chaney died several years later, and is believed to be buried near her husband, James. Also known to be buried in this cemetery is James’ son, Jesse Maynard and his wife Sarah (Welch) Maynard. James was living in the Jesse Maynard household at the time of his death. Words cannot express the gratitude that the Wayne County Genealogical & Historical Society has for the two Maynard descendants who found the grave of their Revolutionary War Ancestor. Plans are now being made to provide a suitable stone for both James Maynard and his wife, Chaney Smith Maynard. We believe the Veterans Administration will furnish a Rev. War Marker for James. We are now pursuing the filing of such application. Fund raising has also begun to provide a Revolutionary War Roadside Marker for James Maynard. These signs are procured through application to the State Government, and cost about $1,800.00 each. All donations should be made by making your check payable to WCGHS, then mail it to WCGHS, P.O. Box 787, Wayne, WV 25570. For additional information, contact the Wayne County Genealogical Society at mail@wcghs.com. _________________________________________________________ UPDATE On Thursday, February 25, The Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society forwarded an application to the Veterans Administration for a grave marker for James Maynard. Along with the application, numerous other files concerning documentation for the application were sent. It is our hope that the application will be approved in the near future, so that we may get the grave marked. If approved, these markers are provided free of charge. We will keep this site updated with any progress. _________________________________________________________ UPDATE March 14, 2016 The Wayne County Genealogical And Historical society has obtained an application for a raodside marker to commemorate Rev. War Soldier James Maynard. This application will soon be completed and forwarded to the West Virginia Department of Archives and History, who are responsible for having these markers made. After the application has been approved, they will order the construction of the marker. When it is ready for delivery, we will need to make full payment for it. I am informed that the current price for these markers is approximately $1975.00. The marker will need to be set on the Department of Highways right-of-way. The location will need to be decided. In the meantime, we must get serious about raising this amount of money to honor James Maynard. Donations will be made to the Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society. (WCGHS) Make your checks payable to WCGHS and mail to WCGHS, P.O. Box 787, Wayne, WV 25570. Your donations will be greatly appreciated. While WCGHS is sponsoring this monument, we are not capable of paying for it, so all who are interested in having this memorial erected to honor James Maynard, must join in and support this project. _________________________________________________________ DONATIONS AS TO DATE Jarrett Peters $200.00 Howard Osburn 20.00 Joan Carter 50.00 Linda Sturgill 50.00 Sandra Mayo 200.00 Ronald & Robert Maynard 100.00 Seibern Hazelett 200.00 Sara E. Marcum 100.00 Doris Staton 100.00 Ervin G. Barker 50.00 Linda (Marcum) Parsons 50.00 Larry B. Maynard 25.00 Ron & James Maynard 100.00 Westmoreland Chapter NSDAR 100.00 Mrs. Connie Jackson Mcagg 100.00 Ms. Wylma Carole Skean 25.00 Mrs. June Booth Ashworth 20.00 Thelma Lee Maynard 25.00 Delbert Maynard 30.00 James H. Ferguson 100.00 Robert & Mary Jervis 100.00 Richard & Fannie Casey 50.00 Hi & Cora Vance 100.00 Cuba (Vance) Thomas 30.00 Tolbert & Judith Maynard 100.00 Mary Jane Sutton 100.00 W. Kenneth Napier 50.00 We are proud to announce that we have reached our fundraising goal for the James Maynard Roadside Marker. The application has been submitted to the West Virginia Department of Archives & History. They have informed us that it will be between three and four months for the completion and setting of the marker. We will be posting updates on the process and when we will plan a dedication ceremony for the marker. The Wayne County Genealogical & Historical Society wishes to thank all who have participated in this process. _________________________________________________________ UPDATE April 5, 2016 Today, the grave marker for James Maynard arrived at the Morris Funeral Home in Wayne, West Virginia. The marker will remain at that location until we are prepared to set it. Plans are underway now for the setting of the marker, and will be posted here as soon as they are complete. _________________________________________________________ UPDATE May 17, 2016 At our monthly meeting in May, it was decided to forego our regular June (June 18, 2016) meeting in Kenova. Instead, we will meet at or near the Church at the Queen’s Ridge Cemetery. Please bring your own lunch, as no food is available in that area. We will have our meeting and lunch and afterward we will erect the monument on the grave of Rev. War Soldier James Maynard. The monument has arrived and is in custody of the Morris Funeral Home. In case of bad weather, the installation will be the following Saturday. Please join us in this historical event. James Maynard was born in 1750 and died in 1852, so this is indeed a one-time event. If you wish, bring along some friends. From State Route 152, turn left toward Cabwaylingo State Park. Continue to the first blacktop road which turns left. (The Coal Haul Road) Follow this road to the Cemetery. PLEASE TRY TO ATTEND GPS 38 01 21.45 N 82 16 02.07 W _________________________________________________________ On June 18, 2016 the installation of the magnificent marker for James Maynard, which was supplied by the Department of Veterans Affairs, was completed. There were 33 people who attended this event. Below are some photos of the day. _________________________________________________________ The James Maynard Highway Marker Has Been Erected. The Department of Highways has erected the Highway Marker for Rev. War Soldier James Maynard. It was erected the first week in June (2017). The marker is located about one mile south of Dunlow, on the road to Cabwaylingo State Park. It is at the mouth of the "Coal Haul Road". The Wayne County Genealogical & Historical Society is planning an unveiling ceremony at 1 PM on Saturday, August 12 of this year (2017). The ceremony will be held at The Dunlow Community Center. After the ceremony, we will proceed to the site of the marker for the unveiling. A convoy will then proceed to The Queens Ridge Cemetery, where James Maynard is buried. This cemetery is about ten miles from the site of the marker. _________________________________________________________





Event
Charleston Gazette-Mail News Article
March 3, 2016 (163 years after death)

Text:
Revolutionary War soldier’s grave found on Wayne ridge top Rick Steelhammer Mar 3, 2016 Ron Maynard and his son, Bob, recently found the grave site of their Revolutionary War ancestor, James Maynard, in Wayne County. James Maynard lived on both sides of the Big Sandy River and died in Wayne County at the age of 102. The gravestone for James Maynard, although the writing is extremely weathered, the initials JM and the number 175 -- probably a reference to 1750, James Maynard's birth year -- are still visible. _________________________________________________________ The whereabouts of Revolutionary War veteran James Maynard’s final resting place has puzzled Daughters of the American Revolution researchers, Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society members and Maynard family descendants for decades But the mystery was finally laid to rest last month. Records indicate that Maynard, the patriarch of the sizable Maynard clan that still populates both the West Virginia and Kentucky sides of the Big Sandy River, moved to the area around 1816. He settled in a section of Floyd County, Kentucky, that later became Pike County. Sometime in the 1840s, he moved across the border to live with a son, Jesse, in Wayne County -- then still part of Virginia. He lived until the age of 102. “We knew that he died on Oct. 13, 1852, in Wayne County, but nobody in this part of the world knew where he was buried,” said Howard Osborne, president of the Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society. After years of searching online historic data and poring through public records from county courthouses in both states in an effort to locate Maynard’s grave, “we never ran into any mention of it,” Osborne said. But the Revolutionary War vet’s fourth-great-grandson, Ron Maynard, and his son, Bob, didn’t let the cold paper trail deter them from continuing the search, which mainly involves cemetery records and on-site searches of dozens of country graveyards. “I’ve searched off and on for probably 20 years,” said Ron Maynard. “I ran into a lady with the DAR who said she’s been searching for years before that. Since then, me and my son have been looking together on our free time.” After discovering during an Internet search that Jesse Maynard’s wife was buried in Queen’s Ridge Cemetery near Dunlow in Wayne County, Ron and Bobby Maynard located her grave, then found Jesse Maynard’s resting place adjacent to it. The two then looked around the cemetery for James Maynard’s grave marker, thinking it would be reasonable to expect that “if his son was buried there, and that James had been living with Jesse and the time of his death, the odds were good he was there, too,” according to Ron Maynard. In mid-February, the father and son team inspected the weathered stone markers atop some of the cemetery’s oldest graves not far from Jesse Maynard’s burial site. “While my son was about 50 feet down the hill looking at Jesse’s grave, he said, ‘Dad, I’d love to see a stone with JM carved on it,’” Ron Maynard recalled. “I decided to look at the crest of the hill, thinking that may be the place where some of the earliest burials were.” A few moments after reaching the top of the ridge, Ron Maynard looked down and saw a small stone that appeared to have weather-eroded carving on its surface. “It just looked like a rock until you looked really close and saw the carving,” he said. “Hey, Bob!” Maynard shouted after examining the rock. “Here’s a stone with ‘JM’ on it!” Below the initials, the number 175 was visible. James Maynard was born in 1750. “The zero at the end of 175 must have eroded off, or it may be on a piece of rock that broke off and is covered up in the dirt,” Ron Maynard said. “We were just elated,” he said. “I couldn’t believe it. Everybody had searched so long to find this place.” “It’s such an exciting thing for Wayne County and this family,” Osborne said of the discovery. “And it’s all thanks to the descendants of James Maynard that the grave site was found.” According to a Revolutionary War veteran’s pension application Maynard filed for, at age 83, he enlisted as a private in a Wilkes County, North Carolina militia unit commanded by Col. Benjamin Cleveland. The colonel lived in Maynard’s hometown of Roaring River, North Carolina, at the time Maynard signed up. “The intention was for me to go down to the sea coast around Charleston, South Carolina, but something occurred which prevented the Wilkes troops from going to the south,” Maynard said during his pension application hearing. That “something” was an outbreak of hostilities by Tories -- citizens loyal to the crown -- in western North Carolina. “The Tories done considerable damage, by killing and murdering the inhabitants that were friendly to American liberty,” Maynard was quoted as saying on his pension application. His militia company, nicknamed “Cleveland’s Bulldogs,” became known as “Cleveland’s Devils” to the British sympathizers they encountered. While Maynard said he took part in no major battles, he was involved in numerous skirmishes with Tories, from the headwaters of the New River to the highlands of Grayson County, Virginia, during his 15 months of Revolutionary War service. One of the officers he served under, Capt. Jesse Franklin, served after the war as a congressman, a U.S. senator, and governor of North Carolina. Maynard’s name is listed along with 15 other Revolutionary war veterans who lived in Pike County on a bronze tablet at Pikeville’s Public Square. He is also listed on a tablet at the Wayne County Courthouse listing the names of 11 Revolutionary War veterans buried in Wayne County. The Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society has applied to the Veterans Administration to have a grave marker recognizing Maynard’s Revolutionary War service placed at his burial site. The society is also raising $1,800 to have a Revolutionary War roadside marker honoring his service installed a highway nearest his grave, now accessible only by traveling a coal company haul road through prior arrangement. “Maynard is one of the most common names in Wayne County,” said Ron Maynard. “Every year, the Maynard Reunion at Cabwaylingo State Forest draws upward of 5,000 people from across the country. We’re hoping we can have the Revolutionary War sign and the new grave marker in place in time for this year’s reunion,” held in September. Now that James Maynard’s resting place has been found, Maynard said, he and his son plan to begin a new quest in North Carolina. “We’re planning to spend some vacation time in Wilkes County to find the grave of James Maynard’s father,” he said. For more information, or to donate to the roadside marker fund, email the Wayne County Genealogical Society at mail@wcghs.com, or call Herb Dawson at 304-393-3792.
Event
The Herald-Dispatch, Huntington, West Virginia, News Article
March 3, 2016 (163 years after death)

Text:
Grave of Revolutionary War solider James Maynard discovered Courtesy of Howard Osburn, Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society Mar 3, 2016 WAYNE - After ten years of searching in hundreds of Wayne County cemeteries, Robert "Bobby" Maynard and his father Ronald "Ron" Maynard, members of the Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society, have located the grave of Revolutionary War soldier James Maynard in the Queens Ridge Cemetery. Robert Maynard applied chalk to help enhance the worn images on the field stone and discovered the initials J.M. along with the numbers 1, 7 and 5. He realized 0 was the missing number. Genealogical records indicate James Maynard was born around 1750. The field stone was found located on the crown of the hill and near the grave of Jesse Maynard, the son with whom James Maynard was living during the 1850 Census. James Maynard was born in Virginia in 1750, then moved to Wilkes County, North Carolina, and served there during the Revolutionary War. He was enlisted for six months as a private under Cpt. Jesse Franklin and Col. Benjamin Cleveland. He moved from North Carolina to Floyd County, Kentucky, around 1816, and then to Pike County, Kentucky. He was granted a pension Sept. 1, 1832, as a citizen of Pike County, Kentucky. By 1841, James Maynard was living in Cabell County, Virginia, a part of Cabell which became Wayne County in 1842. James Maynard died Oct. 13, 1852, in Wayne County, Virginia/West Virginia. The location of his grave was unknown until its recent discovery. James Maynard's widow, Chaney Smith, is believed to be buried near her husband. The pair were married Dec. 25, 1801, in Wilkes County, North Carolina. She was allowed a pension in her application dated Feb. 28, 1857, at which time she was 77 and living in Wayne County, Virginia/West Virginia. There are hundreds, possibly thousands, of descendants of James Maynard still living. The Queens Ridge Cemetery is located on property of Penn Coal Corporation and it can be reached by following the Coal Haul Road from the Cabwaylingo Park Road near Missouri Branch in Wayne County. The Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society now plans to provide a suitable stone for both James Maynard and his wife, Chaney Smith Maynard. Fundraising has also begun to provide a Revolutionary War Roadside Marker for James Maynard. For additional information, contact the Wayne County Genealogical Society at wcghs.com or email mail@wcghs.com; or call Herb Dawson at 304-393-3792, email lhdawson@suddenlink.net, or call Jarrett Peters at 304-429-2033, email mbjjp@zoominternet.net.
Event
The Washington Times Newspaper Article
March 12, 2016 (163 years after death)

Text:
Revolutionary War soldier’s grave found on W.Va. ridge top By RICK STEELHAMMER - Associated Press - Saturday, March 12, 2016 WAYNE, W.Va. (AP) - The whereabouts of Revolutionary War veteran James Maynard’s final resting place has puzzled Daughters of the American Revolution researchers, Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society members and Maynard family descendants for decades But the mystery was finally laid to rest last month. Records indicate that Maynard, the patriarch of the sizable Maynard clan that still populates both the West Virginia and Kentucky sides of the Big Sandy River, moved to the area around 1816. He settled in a section of Floyd County, Kentucky, that later became Pike County. Sometime in the 1840s, he moved across the border to live with a son, Jesse, in Wayne County - then still part of Virginia. He lived until the age of 102. “We knew that he died on Oct. 13, 1852, in Wayne County, but nobody in this part of the world knew where he was buried,” said Howard Osborne, president of the Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society. After years of searching online historic data and poring through public records from county courthouses in both states in an effort to locate Maynard’s grave, “we never ran into any mention of it,” Osborne said. But the Revolutionary War vet’s fourth-great-grandson, Ron Maynard, and his son, Bob, didn’t let the cold paper trail deter them from continuing the search, which mainly involves cemetery records and on-site searches of dozens of country graveyards. “I’ve searched off and on for probably 20 years,” said Ron Maynard. “I ran into a lady with the DAR who said she’s been searching for years before that. Since then, me and my son have been looking together on our free time.” After discovering during an Internet search that Jesse Maynard’s wife was buried in Queen’s Ridge Cemetery near Dunlow in Wayne County, Ron and Bobby Maynard located her grave, then found Jesse Maynard’s resting place adjacent to it. The two then looked around the cemetery for James Maynard’s grave marker, thinking it would be reasonable to expect that “if his son was buried there, and that James had been living with Jesse and the time of his death, the odds were good he was there, too,” according to Ron Maynard. In mid-February, the father and son team inspected the weathered stone markers atop some of the cemetery’s oldest graves not far from Jesse Maynard’s burial site. “While my son was about 50 feet down the hill looking at Jesse’s grave, he said, ‘Dad, I’d love to see a stone with JM carved on it,’” Ron Maynard recalled. “I decided to look at the crest of the hill, thinking that may be the place where some of the earliest burials were.” A few moments after reaching the top of the ridge, Ron Maynard looked down and saw a small stone that appeared to have weather-eroded carving on its surface. “It just looked like a rock until you looked really close and saw the carving,” he said. “Hey, Bob!” Maynard shouted after examining the rock. “Here’s a stone with ‘JM’ on it!” Below the initials, the number 175 was visible. James Maynard was born in 1750. “The zero at the end of 175 must have eroded off, or it may be on a piece of rock that broke off and is covered up in the dirt,” Ron Maynard said. “We were just elated,” he said. “I couldn’t believe it. Everybody had searched so long to find this place.” “It’s such an exciting thing for Wayne County and this family,” Osborne said of the discovery. “And it’s all thanks to the descendants of James Maynard that the grave site was found.” According to a Revolutionary War veteran’s pension application Maynard filed for, at age 83, he enlisted as a private in a Wilkes County, North Carolina militia unit commanded by Col. Benjamin Cleveland. The colonel lived in Maynard’s hometown of Roaring River, North Carolina, at the time Maynard signed up. “The intention was for me to go down to the sea coast around Charleston, South Carolina, but something occurred which prevented the Wilkes troops from going to the south,” Maynard said during his pension application hearing. That “something” was an outbreak of hostilities by Tories — citizens loyal to the crown — in western North Carolina. “The Tories done considerable damage, by killing and murdering the inhabitants that were friendly to American liberty,” Maynard was quoted as saying on his pension application. His militia company, nicknamed “Cleveland’s Bulldogs,” became known as “Cleveland’s Devils” to the British sympathizers they encountered. While Maynard said he took part in no major battles, he was involved in numerous skirmishes with Tories, from the headwaters of the New River to the highlands of Grayson County, Virginia, during his 15 months of Revolutionary War service. One of the officers he served under, Capt. Jesse Franklin, served after the war as a congressman, a U.S. senator, and governor of North Carolina. Maynard’s name is listed along with 15 other Revolutionary war veterans who lived in Pike County on a bronze tablet at Pikeville’s Public Square. He is also listed on a tablet at the Wayne County Courthouse listing the names of 11 Revolutionary War veterans buried in Wayne County. The Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society has applied to the Veterans Administration to have a grave marker recognizing Maynard’s Revolutionary War service placed at his burial site. The society is also raising $1,800 to have a Revolutionary War roadside marker honoring his service installed a highway nearest his grave, now accessible only by traveling a coal company haul road through prior arrangement. “Maynard is one of the most common names in Wayne County,” said Ron Maynard. “Every year, the Maynard Reunion at Cabwaylingo State Forest draws upward of 5,000 people from across the country. We’re hoping we can have the Revolutionary War sign and the new grave marker in place in time for this year’s reunion,” held in September. Now that James Maynard’s resting place has been found, Maynard said, he and his son plan to begin a new quest in North Carolina. “We’re planning to spend some vacation time in Wilkes County to find the grave of James Maynard’s father,” he said. For more information, or to donate to the roadside marker fund, email the Wayne County Genealogical Society at mail@wcghs.com, or call Herb Dawson at 304-393-3792. ___ Information from: The Charleston Gazette-Mail, https://wvgazettemail.com.
Event
TheLevisaLazer.com - Lifestyles News Article
before August 12, 2017 (164 years after death)

Text:
TheLevisaLazer.com - Lifestyles ATTENTION! HONORING REVOLUTIONARY WAR SOLDIER JAMES MAYNARD Written by Special For The Lazer The Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society will conduct a ceremony to honor James Maynard, a Revolutionary War soldier who lived and died in Wayne Co. WV. The dedication will be held on Saturday, August 12 at 1:00 PM. The three part program will begin at the Dunlow Community Center where refreshments will be served. Afterwards a convoy of guests will drive a short distance to the intersection of Cabwaylingo State Park Road and Coal haul road where the newly erected roadside marker has been installed by the WV Dept. of Highways. After the unveiling of the marker, the Westmoreland Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution will place a wreath. American Legion Post 93 Color Guard will then perform a 21 gun salute. The convoy will then proceed to his recently discovered grave and his newly installed military headstone in the Queens Ridge Cemetery. WCGHS would like to invite everyone to attend. Visit (wcghs.com) for more information. By Howard Osborn WCGHS
Event
James Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication
August 12, 2017 (164 years after death)

Text:
JAMES MAYNARD ROADSIDE MARKER DEDICATION On August 12, 2017, the Wayne County Genealogical & Historical Society held a dedication ceremony in honor of James Maynard, Revolutionary War Soldier. The Master of Ceremonies was L. Herbert Dawson, Vice President of WCGHS, who did a wonderful job presenting the program. The ceremony began at the Dunlow Community Center, beginning at 1 p.m. The Tolsia High School Jr. ROTC posted the Colors and then led the audience in the Pledge Of Allegiance. This was followed by the singing of the National Anthem by the audience. An invocation followed led by Greg Michaels. The Rev. Ronald Maynard then proceeded with a presentation about the life of James Maynard, after which the Westmoreland Chapter DAR presented a program honoring James Maynard. A benediction was given by Robert Maynard, son of Rev. Ronald Maynard. It was Ronald Maynard and his son Robert who discovered the rock marking the grave of James Maynard, about a year ago. After the retiring of the Colors by the Tolsia High School Jr. ROTC, a lunch break was taken, where lunch was served to the audience by Sara Marcum, Secretary of the WCGHS. We also had present a number of groups which we were honored to have. These included The Westmoreland Chapter, DAR; Poage Chapter, Dar of Ashland, KY; Louisa Chapter, DAR of Louisa, KY; General Andrew Lewis Chapter, SAR of Huntington, WV; American Legion Post 93 of Ceredo-Kenova, which included the Honor Guard; Dunlow Volunteer Fire Department; Tolsia High School Jr. ROTC, Randall Reid-Smith, Commissioner of the West Virginia Department of Culture and History in Charleston, WV., Connie McCagg and her husband, Howard, who had cleaned off the grounds around the Marker and applied mulch, and to Bill and Addie Likens who manage the Community Center - what great hosts. All together, there were eighty plus persons in attendance. After lunch, a procession to the site of the Highway Marker took place. The Tolsia High School Jr. ROTC again presented the Colors, after which the Marker was unveiled by the officers of the WCGHS, John Jarrett Peters, L. Herbert Dawson, Sara Marcum and Howard Osburn. Then, the American Legion Post 93 Honor Guard, after a brief talk by the Post Chaplain, Bill Spencer, delivered the 21-gun salute, followed by the Pledge of Allegiance. Now, it was time for the trip to the Queen’s Ridge Cemetery, where James Maynard is buried. This convoy was led by the Dunlow Volunteer Fire Department. Many opted to make this ten mile trip, taking pictures and looking around for graves of additional relatives.






Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
Marriage:
brother
himself
Family with Sarah Johnson - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: about 1789Wilkes County, North Carolina
2 years
son
4 years
son
Family with Chaney Smith - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: December 25, 1801Wilkes County, North Carolina
5 years
son
13 years
son
Simeon Maynard
Birth: 1819 69 39Johns Creek, Floyd County, Kentucky
Death: 1915Martin County, Kentucky

MilitaryNewspaper Article
Citation details: Charleston Gazette-Mail News Article, March 3, 2016
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According to a Revolutionary War veteran’s pension application Maynard filed for, at age 83, he enlisted as a private in a Wilkes County, North Carolina militia unit commanded by Col. Benjamin Cleveland. The colonel lived in Maynard’s hometown of Roaring River, North Carolina, at the time Maynard signed up. “The intention was for me to go down to the sea coast around Charleston, South Carolina, but something occurred which prevented the Wilkes troops from going to the south,” Maynard said during his pension application hearing. That “something” was an outbreak of hostilities by Tories -- citizens loyal to the crown -- in western North Carolina. “The Tories done considerable damage, by killing and murdering the inhabitants that were friendly to American liberty,” Maynard was quoted as saying on his pension application. His militia company, nicknamed “Cleveland’s Bulldogs,” became known as “Cleveland’s Devils” to the British sympathizers they encountered. While Maynard said he took part in no major battles, he was involved in numerous skirmishes with Tories, from the headwaters of the New River to the highlands of Grayson County, Virginia, during his 15 months of Revolutionary War service. One of the officers he served under, Capt. Jesse Franklin, served after the war as a congressman, a U.S. senator, and governor of North Carolina.
MarriageVarious Online Sources
MarriageNorth Carolina, County Marriages, 1762-1979
Citation details: FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XFS7-54K : 4 November 2017)
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Name: James Maynard Titles and Terms: Event Type: Marriage Event Date: 10 Mar 1808 Event Place: Wilkes, North Carolina, United States Event Place (Original): Gender: Male Age: Marital Status: Race: Birth Date: Birth Year (Estimated): Birthplace: Marriage License Date: Father's Name: Father's Titles and Terms: Mother's Name: Mother's Titles and Terms: Spouse's Name: Chaney Smith Spouse's Titles and Terms: Spouse's Gender: Female Spouse's Age: Spouse's Race: Spouse's Birth Date: Spouse's Birth Year (Estimated): Spouse's Birthplace: Spouse's Father's Name: Spouse's Father's Titles and Terms: Spouse's Mother's Name: Spouse's Mother's Titles and Terms: Reference ID: GS Film Number: 001730604 Digital Folder Number: 004364804 Image Number: 00191 Citing this Record: "North Carolina, County Marriages, 1762-1979 ," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XFS7-54K : 4 November 2017), James Maynard and Chaney Smith, 10 Mar 1808; citing Wilkes, North Carolina, United States, p. , Office of Archives and History, Division of Archives and Records. State Archive of North Carolina and various county Register of Deeds; FHL microfilm 1,730,604.
CensusCensus, Federal, 1850
Citation details: FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M8DY-HGK : 12 April 2016)
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Name: James Mainard Event Type: Census Event Year: 1850 Event Place: Wayne county, part of, Wayne, Virginia, United States Gender: Male Age: 107 Race: White Race (Original): Birth Year (Estimated): 1743 Birthplace: Virginia Household ID: 462 House Number: 439 Line Number: 27 Affiliate Name: The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) Affiliate Publication Number: M432 Affiliate Film Number: 980 GS Film Number: 444970 Digital Folder Number: 004206470 Image Number: 00501 Household Role Sex Age Birthplace James Mainard M 107 Virginia Chaine Mainard F 70 Virginia Citing this Record: "United States Census, 1850," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M8DY-HGK : 12 April 2016), James Mainard, Wayne county, part of, Wayne, Virginia, United States; citing family 462, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
EventFind A Grave
BurialFind A Grave
EventFind A Grave
EventFind A Grave
EventWayne County, West Virginia, Genealogical & Historical Society
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Revolutionary War Soldier’s Grave Found Two weeks ago, after ten years of intense searching, and checking hundreds of Wayne County cemeteries, Robert (Bobby) Maynard and his father, Ronald (Ron) Maynard, members of The Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society, located the grave of James Maynard in the Queens Ridge Cemetery. Robert said that he actually laid down on the ground to make sure this was the grave of his Maynard ancestor. He then applied chalk to bring out the hidden images on the field stone. He discovered the initials J. M. first. Then he could identify the numbers 175__. It was then that he realized that the zero was the missing number. Genealogical records indicate that James Maynard was born around 1750. From the location on the crown of the hill, and the closeness of his son, Jesse Maynard, with whom James was staying in the 1850 census of Wayne County, VA/WV, another clue was found. This cemetery has had excellent care over the years, and it contains many field stones. Several of these field stones still have readable images after so many years. There are hundreds, possibly thousands, of descendants of James Maynard still living. The Queens Ridge Cemetery is located on property which is nearly surrounded by the property of Penn Coal Corporation, and it can be reached by following the Coal Haul Road from the Cabwaylingo Park Road near Missouri Branch, Wayne County, WV. James Maynard, the Revolutionary War Soldier, was born in Virginia in 1750, moved to Wilkes County, N. C., served in the Revolutionary War there, and moved to Kentucky around 1816. He was listed as a member in the "Roaring River Baptist Church," in the late 1780’s and 1790’s prior to moving to Floyd County, Ky. James Maynard , a resident of Wilkes Co. N.C. enlisted for six months as a private under Captain Jesse Franklin and Colonel Benjamin Cleveland. He moved from Wilkes Co. N.C. to Floyd County, KY, and from there to Pike County, KY. He was granted a pension on Sept 1, 1832, as a citizen of Pike Co. KY. In 1841 he was living in Cabell Co. VA (that part of Cabell which became Wayne Co. in 1842). He died Oct 13, 1852, in Wayne County, VA/WV, and the location of his grave became unknown until discovered by Robert and Ronnie Maynard. The widow of James Maynard, Chaney Smith, whom he married Dec. 25, 1801 in Wilkes County, NC, was allowed a pension in her application on February 28, 1857, at which time she was seventy seven years of age and living in Wayne County, VA/WV. Chaney died several years later, and is believed to be buried near her husband, James. Also known to be buried in this cemetery is James’ son, Jesse Maynard and his wife Sarah (Welch) Maynard. James was living in the Jesse Maynard household at the time of his death. Words cannot express the gratitude that the Wayne County Genealogical & Historical Society has for the two Maynard descendants who found the grave of their Revolutionary War Ancestor. Plans are now being made to provide a suitable stone for both James Maynard and his wife, Chaney Smith Maynard. We believe the Veterans Administration will furnish a Rev. War Marker for James. We are now pursuing the filing of such application. Fund raising has also begun to provide a Revolutionary War Roadside Marker for James Maynard. These signs are procured through application to the State Government, and cost about $1,800.00 each. All donations should be made by making your check payable to WCGHS, then mail it to WCGHS, P.O. Box 787, Wayne, WV 25570. For additional information, contact the Wayne County Genealogical Society at mail@wcghs.com. _________________________________________________________ UPDATE On Thursday, February 25, The Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society forwarded an application to the Veterans Administration for a grave marker for James Maynard. Along with the application, numerous other files concerning documentation for the application were sent. It is our hope that the application will be approved in the near future, so that we may get the grave marked. If approved, these markers are provided free of charge. We will keep this site updated with any progress. _________________________________________________________ UPDATE March 14, 2016 The Wayne County Genealogical And Historical society has obtained an application for a raodside marker to commemorate Rev. War Soldier James Maynard. This application will soon be completed and forwarded to the West Virginia Department of Archives and History, who are responsible for having these markers made. After the application has been approved, they will order the construction of the marker. When it is ready for delivery, we will need to make full payment for it. I am informed that the current price for these markers is approximately $1975.00. The marker will need to be set on the Department of Highways right-of-way. The location will need to be decided. In the meantime, we must get serious about raising this amount of money to honor James Maynard. Donations will be made to the Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society. (WCGHS) Make your checks payable to WCGHS and mail to WCGHS, P.O. Box 787, Wayne, WV 25570. Your donations will be greatly appreciated. While WCGHS is sponsoring this monument, we are not capable of paying for it, so all who are interested in having this memorial erected to honor James Maynard, must join in and support this project. _________________________________________________________ DONATIONS AS TO DATE Jarrett Peters $200.00 Howard Osburn 20.00 Joan Carter 50.00 Linda Sturgill 50.00 Sandra Mayo 200.00 Ronald & Robert Maynard 100.00 Seibern Hazelett 200.00 Sara E. Marcum 100.00 Doris Staton 100.00 Ervin G. Barker 50.00 Linda (Marcum) Parsons 50.00 Larry B. Maynard 25.00 Ron & James Maynard 100.00 Westmoreland Chapter NSDAR 100.00 Mrs. Connie Jackson Mcagg 100.00 Ms. Wylma Carole Skean 25.00 Mrs. June Booth Ashworth 20.00 Thelma Lee Maynard 25.00 Delbert Maynard 30.00 James H. Ferguson 100.00 Robert & Mary Jervis 100.00 Richard & Fannie Casey 50.00 Hi & Cora Vance 100.00 Cuba (Vance) Thomas 30.00 Tolbert & Judith Maynard 100.00 Mary Jane Sutton 100.00 W. Kenneth Napier 50.00 We are proud to announce that we have reached our fundraising goal for the James Maynard Roadside Marker. The application has been submitted to the West Virginia Department of Archives & History. They have informed us that it will be between three and four months for the completion and setting of the marker. We will be posting updates on the process and when we will plan a dedication ceremony for the marker. The Wayne County Genealogical & Historical Society wishes to thank all who have participated in this process. _________________________________________________________ UPDATE April 5, 2016 Today, the grave marker for James Maynard arrived at the Morris Funeral Home in Wayne, West Virginia. The marker will remain at that location until we are prepared to set it. Plans are underway now for the setting of the marker, and will be posted here as soon as they are complete. _________________________________________________________ UPDATE May 17, 2016 At our monthly meeting in May, it was decided to forego our regular June (June 18, 2016) meeting in Kenova. Instead, we will meet at or near the Church at the Queen’s Ridge Cemetery. Please bring your own lunch, as no food is available in that area. We will have our meeting and lunch and afterward we will erect the monument on the grave of Rev. War Soldier James Maynard. The monument has arrived and is in custody of the Morris Funeral Home. In case of bad weather, the installation will be the following Saturday. Please join us in this historical event. James Maynard was born in 1750 and died in 1852, so this is indeed a one-time event. If you wish, bring along some friends. From State Route 152, turn left toward Cabwaylingo State Park. Continue to the first blacktop road which turns left. (The Coal Haul Road) Follow this road to the Cemetery. PLEASE TRY TO ATTEND GPS 38 01 21.45 N 82 16 02.07 W _________________________________________________________ On June 18, 2016 the installation of the magnificent marker for James Maynard, which was supplied by the Department of Veterans Affairs, was completed. There were 33 people who attended this event. Below are some photos of the day. _________________________________________________________ The James Maynard Highway Marker Has Been Erected. The Department of Highways has erected the Highway Marker for Rev. War Soldier James Maynard. It was erected the first week in June (2017). The marker is located about one mile south of Dunlow, on the road to Cabwaylingo State Park. It is at the mouth of the "Coal Haul Road". The Wayne County Genealogical & Historical Society is planning an unveiling ceremony at 1 PM on Saturday, August 12 of this year (2017). The ceremony will be held at The Dunlow Community Center. After the ceremony, we will proceed to the site of the marker for the unveiling. A convoy will then proceed to The Queens Ridge Cemetery, where James Maynard is buried. This cemetery is about ten miles from the site of the marker. _________________________________________________________
EventNewspaper Article
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Revolutionary War soldier’s grave found on Wayne ridge top Rick Steelhammer Mar 3, 2016 Ron Maynard and his son, Bob, recently found the grave site of their Revolutionary War ancestor, James Maynard, in Wayne County. James Maynard lived on both sides of the Big Sandy River and died in Wayne County at the age of 102. The gravestone for James Maynard, although the writing is extremely weathered, the initials JM and the number 175 -- probably a reference to 1750, James Maynard's birth year -- are still visible. _________________________________________________________ The whereabouts of Revolutionary War veteran James Maynard’s final resting place has puzzled Daughters of the American Revolution researchers, Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society members and Maynard family descendants for decades But the mystery was finally laid to rest last month. Records indicate that Maynard, the patriarch of the sizable Maynard clan that still populates both the West Virginia and Kentucky sides of the Big Sandy River, moved to the area around 1816. He settled in a section of Floyd County, Kentucky, that later became Pike County. Sometime in the 1840s, he moved across the border to live with a son, Jesse, in Wayne County -- then still part of Virginia. He lived until the age of 102. “We knew that he died on Oct. 13, 1852, in Wayne County, but nobody in this part of the world knew where he was buried,” said Howard Osborne, president of the Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society. After years of searching online historic data and poring through public records from county courthouses in both states in an effort to locate Maynard’s grave, “we never ran into any mention of it,” Osborne said. But the Revolutionary War vet’s fourth-great-grandson, Ron Maynard, and his son, Bob, didn’t let the cold paper trail deter them from continuing the search, which mainly involves cemetery records and on-site searches of dozens of country graveyards. “I’ve searched off and on for probably 20 years,” said Ron Maynard. “I ran into a lady with the DAR who said she’s been searching for years before that. Since then, me and my son have been looking together on our free time.” After discovering during an Internet search that Jesse Maynard’s wife was buried in Queen’s Ridge Cemetery near Dunlow in Wayne County, Ron and Bobby Maynard located her grave, then found Jesse Maynard’s resting place adjacent to it. The two then looked around the cemetery for James Maynard’s grave marker, thinking it would be reasonable to expect that “if his son was buried there, and that James had been living with Jesse and the time of his death, the odds were good he was there, too,” according to Ron Maynard. In mid-February, the father and son team inspected the weathered stone markers atop some of the cemetery’s oldest graves not far from Jesse Maynard’s burial site. “While my son was about 50 feet down the hill looking at Jesse’s grave, he said, ‘Dad, I’d love to see a stone with JM carved on it,’” Ron Maynard recalled. “I decided to look at the crest of the hill, thinking that may be the place where some of the earliest burials were.” A few moments after reaching the top of the ridge, Ron Maynard looked down and saw a small stone that appeared to have weather-eroded carving on its surface. “It just looked like a rock until you looked really close and saw the carving,” he said. “Hey, Bob!” Maynard shouted after examining the rock. “Here’s a stone with ‘JM’ on it!” Below the initials, the number 175 was visible. James Maynard was born in 1750. “The zero at the end of 175 must have eroded off, or it may be on a piece of rock that broke off and is covered up in the dirt,” Ron Maynard said. “We were just elated,” he said. “I couldn’t believe it. Everybody had searched so long to find this place.” “It’s such an exciting thing for Wayne County and this family,” Osborne said of the discovery. “And it’s all thanks to the descendants of James Maynard that the grave site was found.” According to a Revolutionary War veteran’s pension application Maynard filed for, at age 83, he enlisted as a private in a Wilkes County, North Carolina militia unit commanded by Col. Benjamin Cleveland. The colonel lived in Maynard’s hometown of Roaring River, North Carolina, at the time Maynard signed up. “The intention was for me to go down to the sea coast around Charleston, South Carolina, but something occurred which prevented the Wilkes troops from going to the south,” Maynard said during his pension application hearing. That “something” was an outbreak of hostilities by Tories -- citizens loyal to the crown -- in western North Carolina. “The Tories done considerable damage, by killing and murdering the inhabitants that were friendly to American liberty,” Maynard was quoted as saying on his pension application. His militia company, nicknamed “Cleveland’s Bulldogs,” became known as “Cleveland’s Devils” to the British sympathizers they encountered. While Maynard said he took part in no major battles, he was involved in numerous skirmishes with Tories, from the headwaters of the New River to the highlands of Grayson County, Virginia, during his 15 months of Revolutionary War service. One of the officers he served under, Capt. Jesse Franklin, served after the war as a congressman, a U.S. senator, and governor of North Carolina. Maynard’s name is listed along with 15 other Revolutionary war veterans who lived in Pike County on a bronze tablet at Pikeville’s Public Square. He is also listed on a tablet at the Wayne County Courthouse listing the names of 11 Revolutionary War veterans buried in Wayne County. The Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society has applied to the Veterans Administration to have a grave marker recognizing Maynard’s Revolutionary War service placed at his burial site. The society is also raising $1,800 to have a Revolutionary War roadside marker honoring his service installed a highway nearest his grave, now accessible only by traveling a coal company haul road through prior arrangement. “Maynard is one of the most common names in Wayne County,” said Ron Maynard. “Every year, the Maynard Reunion at Cabwaylingo State Forest draws upward of 5,000 people from across the country. We’re hoping we can have the Revolutionary War sign and the new grave marker in place in time for this year’s reunion,” held in September. Now that James Maynard’s resting place has been found, Maynard said, he and his son plan to begin a new quest in North Carolina. “We’re planning to spend some vacation time in Wilkes County to find the grave of James Maynard’s father,” he said. For more information, or to donate to the roadside marker fund, email the Wayne County Genealogical Society at mail@wcghs.com, or call Herb Dawson at 304-393-3792.
EventNewspaper Article
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Grave of Revolutionary War solider James Maynard discovered Courtesy of Howard Osburn, Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society Mar 3, 2016 WAYNE - After ten years of searching in hundreds of Wayne County cemeteries, Robert "Bobby" Maynard and his father Ronald "Ron" Maynard, members of the Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society, have located the grave of Revolutionary War soldier James Maynard in the Queens Ridge Cemetery. Robert Maynard applied chalk to help enhance the worn images on the field stone and discovered the initials J.M. along with the numbers 1, 7 and 5. He realized 0 was the missing number. Genealogical records indicate James Maynard was born around 1750. The field stone was found located on the crown of the hill and near the grave of Jesse Maynard, the son with whom James Maynard was living during the 1850 Census. James Maynard was born in Virginia in 1750, then moved to Wilkes County, North Carolina, and served there during the Revolutionary War. He was enlisted for six months as a private under Cpt. Jesse Franklin and Col. Benjamin Cleveland. He moved from North Carolina to Floyd County, Kentucky, around 1816, and then to Pike County, Kentucky. He was granted a pension Sept. 1, 1832, as a citizen of Pike County, Kentucky. By 1841, James Maynard was living in Cabell County, Virginia, a part of Cabell which became Wayne County in 1842. James Maynard died Oct. 13, 1852, in Wayne County, Virginia/West Virginia. The location of his grave was unknown until its recent discovery. James Maynard's widow, Chaney Smith, is believed to be buried near her husband. The pair were married Dec. 25, 1801, in Wilkes County, North Carolina. She was allowed a pension in her application dated Feb. 28, 1857, at which time she was 77 and living in Wayne County, Virginia/West Virginia. There are hundreds, possibly thousands, of descendants of James Maynard still living. The Queens Ridge Cemetery is located on property of Penn Coal Corporation and it can be reached by following the Coal Haul Road from the Cabwaylingo Park Road near Missouri Branch in Wayne County. The Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society now plans to provide a suitable stone for both James Maynard and his wife, Chaney Smith Maynard. Fundraising has also begun to provide a Revolutionary War Roadside Marker for James Maynard. For additional information, contact the Wayne County Genealogical Society at wcghs.com or email mail@wcghs.com; or call Herb Dawson at 304-393-3792, email lhdawson@suddenlink.net, or call Jarrett Peters at 304-429-2033, email mbjjp@zoominternet.net.
EventNewspaper Article
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Revolutionary War soldier’s grave found on W.Va. ridge top By RICK STEELHAMMER - Associated Press - Saturday, March 12, 2016 WAYNE, W.Va. (AP) - The whereabouts of Revolutionary War veteran James Maynard’s final resting place has puzzled Daughters of the American Revolution researchers, Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society members and Maynard family descendants for decades But the mystery was finally laid to rest last month. Records indicate that Maynard, the patriarch of the sizable Maynard clan that still populates both the West Virginia and Kentucky sides of the Big Sandy River, moved to the area around 1816. He settled in a section of Floyd County, Kentucky, that later became Pike County. Sometime in the 1840s, he moved across the border to live with a son, Jesse, in Wayne County - then still part of Virginia. He lived until the age of 102. “We knew that he died on Oct. 13, 1852, in Wayne County, but nobody in this part of the world knew where he was buried,” said Howard Osborne, president of the Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society. After years of searching online historic data and poring through public records from county courthouses in both states in an effort to locate Maynard’s grave, “we never ran into any mention of it,” Osborne said. But the Revolutionary War vet’s fourth-great-grandson, Ron Maynard, and his son, Bob, didn’t let the cold paper trail deter them from continuing the search, which mainly involves cemetery records and on-site searches of dozens of country graveyards. “I’ve searched off and on for probably 20 years,” said Ron Maynard. “I ran into a lady with the DAR who said she’s been searching for years before that. Since then, me and my son have been looking together on our free time.” After discovering during an Internet search that Jesse Maynard’s wife was buried in Queen’s Ridge Cemetery near Dunlow in Wayne County, Ron and Bobby Maynard located her grave, then found Jesse Maynard’s resting place adjacent to it. The two then looked around the cemetery for James Maynard’s grave marker, thinking it would be reasonable to expect that “if his son was buried there, and that James had been living with Jesse and the time of his death, the odds were good he was there, too,” according to Ron Maynard. In mid-February, the father and son team inspected the weathered stone markers atop some of the cemetery’s oldest graves not far from Jesse Maynard’s burial site. “While my son was about 50 feet down the hill looking at Jesse’s grave, he said, ‘Dad, I’d love to see a stone with JM carved on it,’” Ron Maynard recalled. “I decided to look at the crest of the hill, thinking that may be the place where some of the earliest burials were.” A few moments after reaching the top of the ridge, Ron Maynard looked down and saw a small stone that appeared to have weather-eroded carving on its surface. “It just looked like a rock until you looked really close and saw the carving,” he said. “Hey, Bob!” Maynard shouted after examining the rock. “Here’s a stone with ‘JM’ on it!” Below the initials, the number 175 was visible. James Maynard was born in 1750. “The zero at the end of 175 must have eroded off, or it may be on a piece of rock that broke off and is covered up in the dirt,” Ron Maynard said. “We were just elated,” he said. “I couldn’t believe it. Everybody had searched so long to find this place.” “It’s such an exciting thing for Wayne County and this family,” Osborne said of the discovery. “And it’s all thanks to the descendants of James Maynard that the grave site was found.” According to a Revolutionary War veteran’s pension application Maynard filed for, at age 83, he enlisted as a private in a Wilkes County, North Carolina militia unit commanded by Col. Benjamin Cleveland. The colonel lived in Maynard’s hometown of Roaring River, North Carolina, at the time Maynard signed up. “The intention was for me to go down to the sea coast around Charleston, South Carolina, but something occurred which prevented the Wilkes troops from going to the south,” Maynard said during his pension application hearing. That “something” was an outbreak of hostilities by Tories — citizens loyal to the crown — in western North Carolina. “The Tories done considerable damage, by killing and murdering the inhabitants that were friendly to American liberty,” Maynard was quoted as saying on his pension application. His militia company, nicknamed “Cleveland’s Bulldogs,” became known as “Cleveland’s Devils” to the British sympathizers they encountered. While Maynard said he took part in no major battles, he was involved in numerous skirmishes with Tories, from the headwaters of the New River to the highlands of Grayson County, Virginia, during his 15 months of Revolutionary War service. One of the officers he served under, Capt. Jesse Franklin, served after the war as a congressman, a U.S. senator, and governor of North Carolina. Maynard’s name is listed along with 15 other Revolutionary war veterans who lived in Pike County on a bronze tablet at Pikeville’s Public Square. He is also listed on a tablet at the Wayne County Courthouse listing the names of 11 Revolutionary War veterans buried in Wayne County. The Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society has applied to the Veterans Administration to have a grave marker recognizing Maynard’s Revolutionary War service placed at his burial site. The society is also raising $1,800 to have a Revolutionary War roadside marker honoring his service installed a highway nearest his grave, now accessible only by traveling a coal company haul road through prior arrangement. “Maynard is one of the most common names in Wayne County,” said Ron Maynard. “Every year, the Maynard Reunion at Cabwaylingo State Forest draws upward of 5,000 people from across the country. We’re hoping we can have the Revolutionary War sign and the new grave marker in place in time for this year’s reunion,” held in September. Now that James Maynard’s resting place has been found, Maynard said, he and his son plan to begin a new quest in North Carolina. “We’re planning to spend some vacation time in Wilkes County to find the grave of James Maynard’s father,” he said. For more information, or to donate to the roadside marker fund, email the Wayne County Genealogical Society at mail@wcghs.com, or call Herb Dawson at 304-393-3792. ___ Information from: The Charleston Gazette-Mail, https://wvgazettemail.com.
EventNewspaper Article
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TheLevisaLazer.com - Lifestyles ATTENTION! HONORING REVOLUTIONARY WAR SOLDIER JAMES MAYNARD Written by Special For The Lazer The Wayne County Genealogical and Historical Society will conduct a ceremony to honor James Maynard, a Revolutionary War soldier who lived and died in Wayne Co. WV. The dedication will be held on Saturday, August 12 at 1:00 PM. The three part program will begin at the Dunlow Community Center where refreshments will be served. Afterwards a convoy of guests will drive a short distance to the intersection of Cabwaylingo State Park Road and Coal haul road where the newly erected roadside marker has been installed by the WV Dept. of Highways. After the unveiling of the marker, the Westmoreland Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution will place a wreath. American Legion Post 93 Color Guard will then perform a 21 gun salute. The convoy will then proceed to his recently discovered grave and his newly installed military headstone in the Queens Ridge Cemetery. WCGHS would like to invite everyone to attend. Visit (wcghs.com) for more information. By Howard Osborn WCGHS
EventWayne County, West Virginia, Genealogical & Historical Society
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JAMES MAYNARD ROADSIDE MARKER DEDICATION On August 12, 2017, the Wayne County Genealogical & Historical Society held a dedication ceremony in honor of James Maynard, Revolutionary War Soldier. The Master of Ceremonies was L. Herbert Dawson, Vice President of WCGHS, who did a wonderful job presenting the program. The ceremony began at the Dunlow Community Center, beginning at 1 p.m. The Tolsia High School Jr. ROTC posted the Colors and then led the audience in the Pledge Of Allegiance. This was followed by the singing of the National Anthem by the audience. An invocation followed led by Greg Michaels. The Rev. Ronald Maynard then proceeded with a presentation about the life of James Maynard, after which the Westmoreland Chapter DAR presented a program honoring James Maynard. A benediction was given by Robert Maynard, son of Rev. Ronald Maynard. It was Ronald Maynard and his son Robert who discovered the rock marking the grave of James Maynard, about a year ago. After the retiring of the Colors by the Tolsia High School Jr. ROTC, a lunch break was taken, where lunch was served to the audience by Sara Marcum, Secretary of the WCGHS. We also had present a number of groups which we were honored to have. These included The Westmoreland Chapter, DAR; Poage Chapter, Dar of Ashland, KY; Louisa Chapter, DAR of Louisa, KY; General Andrew Lewis Chapter, SAR of Huntington, WV; American Legion Post 93 of Ceredo-Kenova, which included the Honor Guard; Dunlow Volunteer Fire Department; Tolsia High School Jr. ROTC, Randall Reid-Smith, Commissioner of the West Virginia Department of Culture and History in Charleston, WV., Connie McCagg and her husband, Howard, who had cleaned off the grounds around the Marker and applied mulch, and to Bill and Addie Likens who manage the Community Center - what great hosts. All together, there were eighty plus persons in attendance. After lunch, a procession to the site of the Highway Marker took place. The Tolsia High School Jr. ROTC again presented the Colors, after which the Marker was unveiled by the officers of the WCGHS, John Jarrett Peters, L. Herbert Dawson, Sara Marcum and Howard Osburn. Then, the American Legion Post 93 Honor Guard, after a brief talk by the Post Chaplain, Bill Spencer, delivered the 21-gun salute, followed by the Pledge of Allegiance. Now, it was time for the trip to the Queen’s Ridge Cemetery, where James Maynard is buried. This convoy was led by the Dunlow Volunteer Fire Department. Many opted to make this ten mile trip, taking pictures and looking around for graves of additional relatives.
MarriageJames Maynard and Chaney Smith Marriage RecordJames Maynard and Chaney Smith Marriage Record
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EventJames Maynard ObituaryJames Maynard Obituary
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BurialJames Maynard Original TombstoneJames Maynard Original Tombstone
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BurialInstallation of James Maynard's New Tombstone (Photo 2 of 3)Installation of James Maynard's New Tombstone (Photo 2 of 3)
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EventCertificate of Pension issued to the widow of James Maynard who served in the Revolutionary War as a privateCertificate of Pension issued to the widow of James Maynard who served in the Revolutionary War as a private
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EventPlaque Dedicated to Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried in Wayne County, West VirginiaPlaque Dedicated to Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried in Wayne County, West Virginia
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EventJames Maynard Original TombstoneJames Maynard Original Tombstone
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EventRonald Maynard and his son Robert found James Maynard's original tombstoneRonald Maynard and his son Robert found James Maynard's original tombstone
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EventJames Maynard's New TombstoneJames Maynard's New Tombstone
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EventInstallation of James Maynard's New Tombstone (Photo 1 of 3)Installation of James Maynard's New Tombstone (Photo 1 of 3)
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EventInstallation of James Maynard's New Tombstone (Photo 2 of 3)Installation of James Maynard's New Tombstone (Photo 2 of 3)
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EventInstallation of James Maynard's New Tombstone (Photo 3 of 3)Installation of James Maynard's New Tombstone (Photo 3 of 3)
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EventJames Maynard Roadside MarkerJames Maynard Roadside Marker
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EventJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - Tolsia High School Jr. ROTCJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - Tolsia High School Jr. ROTC
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EventJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - Rev. Ronald MaynardJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - Rev. Ronald Maynard
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EventJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - Ladies from the Poague Chapter DAR, Ashland, KY - Teresa Melvin, Debbie Mecca and Marilyn OppenheimerJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - Ladies from the Poague Chapter DAR, Ashland, KY - Teresa Melvin, Debbie Mecca and Marilyn Oppenheimer
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EventJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - L. Herbert Dawson, Howard Osburn, John Jarrett Peters and Sara MarcumJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - L. Herbert Dawson, Howard Osburn, John Jarrett Peters and Sara Marcum
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EventJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - Maynard Descendants at the markerJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - Maynard Descendants at the marker
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EventJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - American Legion Post 92 Honor GuardJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - American Legion Post 92 Honor Guard
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EventJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - Ladies from the Westmoreland Chapter DAR at the gravesite. - Wylma Skean, Linda Parsons and Connie McCaggJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - Ladies from the Westmoreland Chapter DAR at the gravesite. - Wylma Skean, Linda Parsons and Connie McCagg
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Media objectJames Maynard Roadside MarkerJames Maynard Roadside Marker
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Media objectJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - Tolsia High School Jr. ROTCJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - Tolsia High School Jr. ROTC
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Media objectJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - Rev. Ronald MaynardJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - Rev. Ronald Maynard
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Media objectJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - Ladies from the Poague Chapter DAR, Ashland, KY - Teresa Melvin, Debbie Mecca and Marilyn OppenheimerJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - Ladies from the Poague Chapter DAR, Ashland, KY - Teresa Melvin, Debbie Mecca and Marilyn Oppenheimer
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Media objectJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - L. Herbert Dawson, Howard Osburn, John Jarrett Peters and Sara MarcumJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - L. Herbert Dawson, Howard Osburn, John Jarrett Peters and Sara Marcum
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Media objectJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - Maynard Descendants at the markerJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - Maynard Descendants at the marker
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Media objectJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - American Legion Post 92 Honor GuardJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - American Legion Post 92 Honor Guard
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Media objectJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - Ladies from the Westmoreland Chapter DAR at the gravesite. - Wylma Skean, Linda Parsons and Connie McCaggJames Maynard Roadside Marker Dedication - Ladies from the Westmoreland Chapter DAR at the gravesite. - Wylma Skean, Linda Parsons and Connie McCagg
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Media objectJames Maynard Original TombstoneJames Maynard Original Tombstone
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Media objectRonald Maynard and his son Robert found James Maynard's original tombstoneRonald Maynard and his son Robert found James Maynard's original tombstone
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Media objectJames Maynard's New TombstoneJames Maynard's New Tombstone
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Media objectInstallation of James Maynard's New Tombstone (Photo 2 of 3)Installation of James Maynard's New Tombstone (Photo 2 of 3)
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Media objectInstallation of James Maynard's New Tombstone (Photo 3 of 3)Installation of James Maynard's New Tombstone (Photo 3 of 3)
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Media objectJames Maynard and Chaney Smith Marriage RecordJames Maynard and Chaney Smith Marriage Record
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Media objectPlaque Dedicated to Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried in Wayne County, West VirginiaPlaque Dedicated to Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried in Wayne County, West Virginia
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Media objectCertificate of Pension issued to the widow of James Maynard who served in the Revolutionary War as a privateCertificate of Pension issued to the widow of James Maynard who served in the Revolutionary War as a private
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Media objectJames Maynard ObituaryJames Maynard Obituary
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